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How I loss my data

Hi,
I use Caboodle to keep the manuals or documentations of hardware, coffee maker… These are PDF files. This morning, I put a big pdf file (219 Mo). By double clicking on this file, the file open in preview, caboodle quit suddendly and, when I reopen it, there is no more date in it… The only way to restore is time machine…
I've done this three times…
regards,
Éric Boissicat
Sorry for my poor english, but my mother was teaching it, not speaking it…

David Sinclair's picture

Re: How I loss my data

I recommend not storing large files in Caboodle (for now). Every time you launch the app, it has to read in all of the data, and every time you alter an entry, it has to save all of the data.

I will be changing the data storage model in a version sometime next year (probably adding iCloud support under Lion, too). But in the meantime, I recommend storing large files in a folder on your computer, and alias them into Caboodle by holding Ctrl when dragging into Caboodle (the pointer will change to indicate an alias).

Re: How I loss my data

Maybe Caboodle should make its own backups? Preferrably detecting problems saving so it can fall back to a previous version (while, of course, alerting the user). Trusting data to be secure is incredibly important.

David Sinclair's picture

Re: How I loss my data

Caboodle stores the previous save as a short-term backup, and saves atomically, meaning it only replaces the file if successful. I am thinking about storing more backups, though will probably rely on iCloud for that in future versions.

Re: How I loss my data

That sounds quite safe. But in that case there should be very little risk for the problems orkal describes. There is of course the question of what a "big" file is. I never saw any point in putting PDFs into Caboodle, I use it for structured notes.

David Sinclair's picture

Re: How I loss my data

Since Caboodle reads all of the data into memory, in theory Caboodle could handle a total data size of up to the 32-bit addressable virtual memory limit, 4 GB. But in practice the limit would be a bit smaller than that, since other data has to fit in that address space too. And with large PDFs and other attachments, it could be all too easy to reach that limit if everything is dumped in Caboodle.

Which is why I recommend aliasing large files into entries.

In the future, I'll move Caboodle to 64-bit Intel-only, which will greatly increase the addressable space. Plus, I'll change the data model so it only reads and writes the entries that are accessed, rather than everything. Those changes are planned for next year sometime.